• Images
  • Text
  • Find a Couple + Registry
GO

Kasey & Jason: A Navajo Wedding in Page, AZ

  • Largo Photography, Phoenix
    The groom’s family’s ranch, Page
Add to Favorites
Add to Favorites
Kasey & Jason in Page, AZ
Add to Favorites
Add to Favorites
Kasey’s wedding gown, which was inspired by traditional Navajo dress, was handmade by Jason’s aunt from peach-hued satin. “I added a modern, swoop neck design, bell sleeves, an A-line skirt with lots of movement, and a silver Concho belt,” Kasey explains. She also wore a vintage Navajo necklace, turquoise earrings, and a pair of turquoise cuff brac ...
Add to Favorites
Add to Favorites
The bride styled her own hair in a French twist, accenting it with fresh alstroemeria.
Add to Favorites
Add to Favorites
Jason and his four groomsmen wore traditional long-sleeved velveteen shirts which that were custom-made for them, the groom’s in brown and his attendants’ in black. Jason also wore a vintage Navajo cuff bracelet which that matched the bride’s necklace, her wedding gift to him.
Add to Favorites
Add to Favorites
The Navajo ceremony began with the bride and groom washing each other’s hands, then eating white and yellow corn meal (symbolizing male and female), which the medicine man combined in a bowl and blessed. “After the bride and groom eat the corn mush, the groom’s family, one by one, will eat some as well,” Kasey explains. “If there is any left, the b ...
The groom’s family’s ranch, Page
Add to Favorites
Add to Favorites
After the medicine man finished the Navajo ceremony, the couple’s mothers read a Navajo chant. Then the father of the groom officiated for the Western portion of the ceremony. Kasey and Jason read vows they’d written themselves before exchanging rings.
Add to Favorites
Add to Favorites
Kasey and Jason knew from the beginning of their planning that they wanted to have a traditional Navajo ceremony, which meant building a Hogan, a traditional structure integral to the ceremony. The Hogan is a sacred home for the Diné (Navajo) people who practice traditional religion,” explains Kasey. Kasey and Jason built their Hogan from the groun ...
The groom’s family’s ranch, Page
Add to Favorites
Add to Favorites
After the ceremony, guests enjoyed a traditional Navajo feast. Using leftover logs from the Hogan, Kasey and Jason built a canopy they decked with lights, and guests dined under the desert sky.
The groom’s family’s ranch, Page
Add to Favorites
Add to Favorites
“Our decorations were simple, yet perfectly fit our surroundings,” Kasey says. Silver buckets filled with orange and white alstroemeria sat atop brown linens, with votive candles adding a little glow.
Add to Favorites
Add to Favorites
The ceremony began with Jason and the groomsmen riding in on horseback. “Traditionally, the groom and his family would travel to the bride’s camp, offering horses as a dowry for the bride,” Kasey says. “Seeing the men ride in from a distance was simply breathtaking.”
Add to Favorites
Add to Favorites
The Navajo ceremony began with the bride and groom washing each other’s hands, then eating white and yellow corn meal (symbolizing male and female), which the medicine man combined in a bowl and blessed. “After the bride and groom eat the corn mush, the groom’s family, one by one, will eat some as well,” Kasey explains. “If there is any left, the b ...
The groom’s family’s ranch, Page

Kasey & Jason in Page, AZ

Kasey and Jason first met while both were servers at the Old Town Tortilla Factory restaurant in Scottsdale. Soon after, they had their first date at the Marshall Garden in the Scottsdale Civic Center Mall. “We sat there for a long time just talking and getting to know each other,” Kasey remembers. The Bride Kasey Green, 29, operations assistant/wedding coordinator The Groom Jason Croxton, 28, planner/law student The Date August 19 A year later, on the couple’s one-year anniversary, Jason took Kasey back to that same spot after taking her out to dinner. The couple sat down and reminisced about the times they’d had over the past year, “then he started to get really ‘mushy,’ and before I knew it, he got down on one knee and popped the question!” Kasey says. After embracing for a long time, Jason finally had to ask her if she wanted to see the ring! The two wed just nine months later in a ceremony that incorporated Navajo traditions.
- Kate Wood
Their Ingredients
  • Largo Photography, Phoenix

tell us what you think!

Post

please note there is a 2000 character limit.

to share your thoughts

Log in ▸

knotties who love this

Thanks for sharing your feedback!
It may take a few minutes to publish, so please be patient if it doesn’t show up right away.