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This Is How Much a Wedding Costs on Average, According to Real Data

Don't let this number scare you—it's an average!
Average Wedding Cost
John David Weddings
Maggie Seaver
by Maggie Seaver
Updated Feb 14, 2020

Exciting news for to-be-weds: The Knot 2019 Real Weddings Study has officially arrived! We surveyed over 27,000 couples who got married in 2019 to uncover the latest trends, the average size of weddings, the most popular venues (both indoors and outdoors) as well as the average wedding cost in America. Now more than ever, couples are bucking tradition to personalize their nuptials with thoughtful details— changing what weddings look like (and how much they cost). Based on our respondents' answers, we were able to determine the new national average cost  of a wedding, which is $33,900 (that's including the cost of the engagement ring, but excluding honeymoon expenses).

Before you start hyperventilating, keep in mind that the average wedding cost is just that: an average dollar amount, which has been calculated by combining the total cost of tens of thousands of weddings, then dividing that sum by the number of couples surveyed.

Average Cost of a Wedding In The U.S. By State

Keep in mind too: these couples come from all over the U.S. and have entirely different wedding budgets, locations, head counts and styles. What they end up spending naturally varies—a lot. Throwing a wedding in a densely populated, expensive destination (a big city like New York or Chicago, for example) costs more than it does in a smaller or less populated location (such as Idaho, West Virginia or Wyoming). See the average cost of a wedding in the U.S. by state (excluding Alaska), below:

  • Alabama: $25,500
  • Arkansas: $21,800
  • Arizona: $29,400
  • California: $39,000
  • Colorado: $30,000
  • Connecticut: $41,000
  • Delaware: $34,900
  • DC: $40,600
  • Florida: $30,600
  • Georgia: $30,900
  • Hawaii: $32,900
  • Idaho: $19,800
  • Iowa: $22,600
  • Illinois: $39,700
  • Indiana: $22,800
  • Kentucky: $23,900
  • Kansas: $22,400
  • Louisiana: $33,900
  • Maine: $33,500
  • Maryland: $33,800
  • Massachusetts: $43,600
  • Michigan: $29,700
  • Minnesota: $28,800
  • Mississippi: $23,800
  • Missouri: $26,600
  • Montana: $23,000
  • Nebraska: $23,300
  • Nevada: $22,500
  • New Hampshire: $32,100
  • New Jersey: $53,400
  • New Mexico: $25,600
  • New York: $48,600
  • North Carolina: $29,500
  • North Dakota & South Dakota: $29,200
  • Ohio: $29,300
  • Oklahoma: $21,200
  • Oregon: $22,400
  • Pennsylvania: $35,900
  • Rhode Island: $49,800
  • South Carolina: $30,600
  • Tennessee: $26,900
  • Texas: $30,200
  • Utah: $19,700
  • Vermont: $38,300
  • Virginia: $33,300
  • Washington: $25,600
  • West Virginia: $26,500
  • Wisconsin: $27,800
  • Wyoming: $19,800

So, what's all that money going toward? Couples are investing in hyper-personalized events infused with meaningful details, like their go-to movies or their favorite date-night food. Our respondents are also tapping a professional to help them pull it all off, as our study shows that nearly a third of couples hired some form of a wedding planner (whether it be a day-of coordinator or a full-service planner). Many wholeheartedly embrace or blend their cultural customs, while others intentionally turn tradition on its head by paying homage to pop culture (Harry Potter stilettos, anyone?), nixing old-school activities (like the garter toss) or reinventing big moments to suit their individual style (think: tequila shot unity ceremonies). Today's couples want their wedding to be a true expression of their unique love story and for guests to leave saying, "That was so them."

Speaking of guests, couples go to great lengths to make sure their loved ones have an absolute blast. The average couple hosts 131 guests, and 72 percent of those surveyed said their top priority was ensuring their guests were taken care of and had a good time. Besides the expected food, drink and music, nearly half of all couples hire or provide above-and-beyond guest entertainment. We're talking photo booths, cigar-rolling stations and craft margarita bars, to name a few. 

Alcohol is also a major part of the average wedding cost, as 92 percent of all couples who wed in 2019 served beer, wine or spirits to guests. According to our study, half of those surveyed included a champagne toast in their post-ceremony festivities.

And, of course, no wedding can happen without an entire team of incredible vendors. To-be-weds continue to lean on best-in-class local pros to make their day unforgettable, whether it's a macramé artist for bespoke bohemian wall décor or the perfect planner to bring their Jewish-Chinese fusion celebration to life.

Average Cost of Wedding Vendors

Of course, how much wedding pros charge varies—a lot. It's always best to research wedding vendors in your area and ask them about thier specific rates (and what those rates include). An internal study found out exactly what couples spend on different wedding vendors last year on average. See the average cost of wedding vendors in 2019, below:

See how the average wedding cost in 2019 compares to previous years' price tags. The average cost of a wedding in 2018 was $33,931, which is $30 more than this year's national average. Interestingly enough, the average cost of a wedding in 2017 was $33,391, which is down from 2016, when the average spend on weddings reached an all-time high of $35,309. In 2015, couples spent about $3,000 less, averaging $32,641  for their weddings. The average cost of weddings in 2014 was just under $30,000—coming out to $29,858, while the average wedding cost  in 2013 was $28,427.

Looking for some help with your wedding spend? Check out The Knot Wedding Budget Planner.

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