A Union League Club of Chicago Wedding in Chicago, Illinois

While two grand venues made Jackie and Peter’s wedding formal and elegant, subtle incorporation of some of their favorite things—like architecture, mu

While two grand venues made Jackie and Peter’s wedding formal and elegant, subtle incorporation of some of their favorite things—like architecture, music, the color blue and memories from their eight-year relationship—made the high school sweethearts’ wedding one of a kind.

Jackie and Peter’s ceremony meshed Korean, American and Catholic traditions, and the readings were spoken in both English and Korean.
To complement the subtle architecture theme, the ceremony programs had a sketch of the ceremony venue.
Jackie and Peter shared their first dance as husband and wife to “Your Song” by Elton John.
Blue is the bride’s favorite color, so she incorporated the hue into her bouquet with clusters of pale blue hydrangeas.
Although they didn’t walk down the aisle, two girls wore tulle dresses with slate belts to match the bridesmaid dresses.
Each place setting included china from the Union League Club, a satin navy napkin, a formal menu card and a favor, which was a cookie decorated with the couple’s monogram.
The couple chose the Union League Club because its dark decor nicely complemented their midnight blue and silver palette.
As an alternative photo booth, Jackie and Peter set out a Polaroid camera for guests to snap pictures on.
Blue hydrangeas and grape hyacinth in a silver vase perfectly matched the silver and blue color palette.
Jackie originally planned on navy dresses, but later realized gray would pop better against the dark reception venue. Her bridesmaids all wore floor-length Jenny Yoo gowns.
This Nicole Miller sheath gown with a lace illusion neckline was the first dress Jackie tried on. Her mother, a seamstress, added elbow-length sleeves to customize it for the bride.
“[The venue] seemed perfect because I love and breathe music , and Peter, architecture,” Jackie says. “Not only did it have architectural history, it was a place that houses music. It was a dream venue.”
Going with the subtle architecture and music theme, the tables were named after famous architects and composers from the past.