How to Address Wedding Invitations

Check out our guide to addressing wedding invitation envelopes correctly.
by Maddy Sims

By this point, you've likely selected your stationery and collected information from guests—and now you're looking into how to address wedding invitations. There's a lot that goes into sending your invites (like the wording, for example), which is why we created this guide. No matter who you're sending an invite to, here's exactly how to address your wedding invitations.

Traditional etiquette indicates the outer envelope of your wedding invitation should be more formal with titles and/or full names, while the inner envelope is more informal (leaving out first names, titles or last names). Since titles can be restricting and exclusive (especially if select guests don't identify as "Mrs.," "Ms.," "Miss.," or "Mr."), know that they aren't necessary—you're free to simply use your guests' names and leave the titles off.

Give yourself enough time to get the addresses in order (double check anyone you're not sure about) so you can send your invitations out in time. Once you have all the information you need, head over to The Knot Invitations to check out the guest addressing service. Ready to get the invite process started? Here's exactly how to address wedding invitation envelopes for different scenarios.

How to Address Wedding Invitations to A Married Couple

If you're inviting a married couple, put their names on the same line. You're free to forgo titles and list the names separately (as shown below in example one). If they have different last names, list the person you're closest with first. If you're equally close with them, go in alphabetical order. Or, if one person has taken the other person's name, you can address the invitation to reflect that (shown below in example two).

Example One:

On the outer envelope:

Ms. Celine Elgin and Ms. Jacqueline Purcell

Or

Celine Elgin and Jacqueline Purcell

On the inner envelope:

Ms. Elgin and Ms. Purcell

Or

Celine and Jacqueline

Example 2:

On the outer envelope:

Mr. John and Mrs. Samantha Rivera

Or

Mr. and Mrs. John Rivera

On the inner envelope:

Mr. and Mrs. Rivera

Or

John and Samantha

How to Address Invitations to An Unmarried Couple Living Together

If you're wondering how to address invitations to an unmarried couple living together, it's similar to married couples. Both names should be included on the envelopes, but in this case, each name gets its own line.

On the outer envelope:

Mr. Aaron Triguiero

Mr. Gabriel Reyes

On the inner envelope:

Mr. Triguiero

Mr. Reyes

How to Address Wedding Invitations to A Married Doctor or Two Married Doctors

It's proper etiquette to address a doctor with their official title. If the couple doesn't share a last name, be sure that your wedding invitations reflect that.

On the outer envelope:

Dr. Anne Barker and Mr. Peter Underwood

If the doctor uses their partner's name socially:

Dr. Anne and Mr. Peter Underwood

If both parties are doctors, address the outer envelope:

Doctors Anne and Peter Underwood

On the inner envelope:

Dr. Barker and Mr. Underwood

Or

The Doctors Underwood

How to Address Wedding Invitations to Those With Other Distinguished Titles

Apply the same rules you use for doctors for military personnel, judges, reverends and so on. If both titles don't fit on one line, indent the second line.

On the outer envelope:

The Honorable Jane Kelly and Lieutenant Jonathan Kelly, US Navy

If they're both captains in the military: 

Captains Jane and Jonathan Kelly, US Navy

On the inner envelope:

Judge Kelly and Lieutenant Kelly, US Navy

Or

The Captains Kelly

How to Address Wedding Invitations to Children and Families

Include younger guests on the inner envelope of their parents' invitation by their name(s). For girls under 18, you can use "Miss" if you'd like. Boys don't need a title until they're 18—then they can be addressed as "Mr."  As with the other guests invited, you can always forgo titles or use the gender-neutral title of "Mx."

Note: If you don't include each child's name, you're implying that children are not invited. That said, don't be surprised if some guests still mistakenly assume their children are welcome. If you're concerned this will happen with your guests, ask your immediate family and wedding party to help spread the word that the wedding will be adults only and add the message to your wedding website. You may still have to follow up with guests who don't get the message via phone to gently explain the situation.

On the outer envelope:

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Abraham

On the inner envelope:

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Abraham

Daniel, Jeffrey, Miss Brittany and Mx. Kelly

How to Address Wedding Invitations to Children 18 and Older

Children 18 and older should receive their own invitations (unless they're living at home with their parents). You don't need to use titles, but you can if you'd like. Just be sure that you're using the correct identifiers for the guests. If you're unsure about their preferred title, it might be best to forego titles in general, or use "Mx."

On the outer envelope:

Ms. Audrey Abraham

Or

Mr. Jack Abraham

Or

Mx. Jack Abraham

On the inner envelope:

Ms. Abraham

Or

Mr. Abraham

Or

Mx. Abraham

Wedding Invitations from Minted
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