Your Wedding Vendor Tipping Cheat Sheet

Our expert tips on how to tip.
kim forrest the knot
by
Kim Forrest
kim forrest the knot
Kim Forrest
Senior Editor
  • Kim writes and edits articles for The Knot Worldwide, with a speciality in etiquette and planning advice
  • Kim manages freelance writers for The Knot Worldwide
  • Prior to The Knot Worldwide, Kim was Associate Bridal Editor at Washingtonian magazine and Associate Fashion Editor at Conde Nast’s Brides Local magazines
Updated Jan 21, 2022

When you're already digging deep into your (or your parents') pockets for wedding expenses, allotting room in your budget for gratuities on top of that can be hard to handle. And even though service charges may be spelled out in your contract, tipping—although not mandatory—is always appreciated for a job well done, not to mention a kind and thoughtful gesture. So don't forget to factor in tips when making your wedding budget.

Since some wedding vendors will expect a gratuity, and other gratuities will need to be considered on a case-by-case basis, you have a few things to consider. Traditionally, business owners of larger companies don't get tipped—just their employees—but you can and should tip an owner when the service exceeds expectations. Small business owners should never be overlooked either, since their businesses are often run by just one person.

Tip wedding vendors who offer exceptional service, write thank-you notes (they're always appreciated) and assign the responsibility of handing them out to a trusted person, such as your wedding planner, a parent or wedding party member. Here's a helpful breakdown of what's customary for tipping each vendor.

Wedding Planner

Wedding planners won't likely expect anything, but if yours did a great job, you can always offer a token of appreciation. (Note: Nonmonetary thank-yous like professional photos of the wedding for the planner's portfolio can go a long way too.) About 50 percent of couples do tip their planners.

Protocol: Optional

The Standard: 10–20 percent, up to $500, or a nice gift

When to Tip: Hand off the envelope at the end of the reception or send a thank-you note with photos or a check right after the honeymoon.

Wedding Hairstylist and Makeup Artist

This is one area where gratuity is definitely expected. Tip between 15 to 25 percent just as you would in a hair salon, and consider giving a little extra if there's a crisis, like one of your bridesmaids has a meltdown over her curls and it requires a redo at the last minute.

Protocol: Expected

The Standard: 15–25 percent, depending upon the quality of service

When to Tip: Tip your beauty stylists at the end of your service.

Wedding Delivery and Setup Staff

Slip a few dollars to anyone delivering important items to the site such as the wedding cake, flowers or sound system. If a lot of gear needs to be brought in and set up (tents, chairs or portable toilets), the workers deserve a tip too.

Protocol: Expected

The Standard: $5–$10 per person

When to Tip: Drop off cash envelopes the day before the wedding to the catering manager so the person accepting deliveries can distribute the tip.

Wedding Ceremony Officiant

If your officiant is affiliated with a church or synagogue, you're often expected to make a donation to that institution. If you're a member, you'll probably want to give a larger amount than if you're not. However, if you're getting married there and they're charging you to use the space, feel free to give a smaller amount. Tipping the wedding officiant, both nondenominational and denominational, is also appreciated.

Protocol: Expected (depending on officiant)

The Standard: Donate $100–$500 to the church or synagogue, and for the officiant, a tip of $50-$100 (maybe more, depending on how much time they've spent with you leading up to the wedding, say, in premarital counseling, for example).

When to Tip: Most ceremony fees are required prior to the wedding. Otherwise, have a responsible attendant pass the cash envelope at the rehearsal dinner if the officiant is in attendance.

Wedding Ceremony Musicians

If you worked with a mini orchestra to come up with the perfect score for your service and they pulled it off flawlessly, consider showing some monetary thanks for their talent. However, you probably don't have to tip the solo church organist who was required to play.

Protocol: Optional

The Standard: $15–$20 per musician

When to Tip: Ceremony musicians should receive a tip at the end of the ceremony.

Wedding Photographer and Videographer

You're not expected to give your shutterbugs any money beyond their normal fees. But if the wedding photographer or videographer doesn't own the studio, consider tipping each person (or give a certain amount with a thank-you note to disperse to staff).

Protocol: Optional

The Standard: $50–$200 per vendor

When to Tip: Tip your photographer and videographer at the end of the reception.

Attire Alterations Pros

While it's not required to give the person who is altering your wedding dress, suit or other wedding attire a tip, it's definitely a nice gesture.

Protocol: Optional

The Standard: $20 to $30

When to Tip: If you're opting to tip your alterations pro, give them the envelope at your final fitting.

Wedding Reception Staff

This group includes the on-site wedding coordinator, maître d' and banquet manager. A service charge (typically 2 percent) is almost always built in to the food and drink fee, so check your contract. If the gratuity is not included, tip as follows.

Protocol: Expected

The Standard: 15–20 percent of the food and drink fee or $200–$300 for the maître d'

When to Tip: If it's covered in the contract, the final bill is typically due before the reception. Otherwise, have one of your parents or an attendant hand the envelope to the maître d' at the end of the reception, since you'll need to know the final tab to calculate the percentage.

colorful wedding tablescape
Kate Supa Photography

Wedding Reception Attendants

When it comes to bartenders and waitstaff, and parking, photo booth, bathroom and coatroom attendants, the rules of tipping are dictated by your contract. If the service fee is included, consider doling out extra only if the service was exceptional. If it's not included, ask ahead of time how many attendants will be working your wedding and calculate on a per person basis.

Protocol: Optional, based on contract

The Standard: 10–20 percent of the liquor or food bill to be split among bartenders or catering staff respectively, $1 per wedding guest for coatroom and $1 per car for parking attendants

When to Tip: Although tips are traditionally passed out at the end of the event, you could distribute them at the beginning of the evening to encourage all the workers to give you great service.

Wedding Reception Band or DJ

Whether you hire a 12-piece swing band or a single DJ, tipping musicians is completely optional, depending on the quality of the job and how willing they were to follow your ideal playlist. And don't forget about any sound technicians they bring with them.

Protocol: Optional, yet preferred

The Standard: $25–$35 per musician; $50–$150 for DJs

When to Tip: An attendant should tip the musicians or DJ at the end of the reception.

Wedding Transportation Company

Again, check your contract, as gratuity is usually included. If it isn't, plan to tip provided they show up on time, provide a smooth ride and don't get lost.

Protocol: Expected

The Standard: 15–20 percent of the total bill

When to Tip: Tip transportation pros at the end of the night or after the last ride. If you used a separate company for the guest buses, designate a bus captain to hand the driver a tip, otherwise this duty falls to a designated attendant.

Cake Baker, Florist and Stationer

These vendors do not typically receive tips, but if you feel they went above and beyond the call of duty, you certainly can send them a tip. Remember, though, that delivery people who work for these pros should be tipped (see above).

Protocol: Optional

The Standard: $50 to $100, or a small gift

When to Tip: If you'd like to tip these pros, send them a thank-you card with the tip enclosed after the big day.

General Wedding Tipping Tips

Read contracts closely.

Some vendors (particularly caterers and transportation companies) may include tips as part of their contract. If gratuities are included in the contract, you don't need to provide any additional tips.

Write a review.

While writing a thank-you note is certainly appreciated, a positive review on a site like The Knot goes even further in helping a wedding pro's business. Ask your wedding vendor if there's a particular site where they'd like you to post your review.

For destination weddings, learn the local customs.

If you're getting married outside the U.S., be sure to ask your wedding planner or venue coordinator about the local tipping customs. Also, make sure you tip in the local currency when providing cash tips to vendors.

Share photos.

Sharing professional photos from your big day is another way to thank your wedding vendors. Pros, particularly florists, cake bakers, stationers and planners, need photos of their work for marketing materials, so if you're able to get permission from your photographer to provide these images, you'll score extra points.

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