Wedding Flower Trends 2014

Let these of-the-moment trends inspire your wildest flower dreams.
  1. Leafy Garlands

    Leafy garlands for bride and groom chairs at wedding reception
    Photo by Aaron Delesie

    What's more festive than festoons of blooms, ribbon and foliage? "We're seeing lots of garlands—garlands on the back of the bride and groom's chairs, garlands as centerpieces, garlands in the ceremony," says Sierra Steifman of Poppies & Posies in New York City. In India, floral garlands have a traditional role in festivals, including marriage ceremonies. Incorporate the trend in a way that feels right for your venue and style. Worried about centerpieces that obstruct conversation? Opt for a deep green, leafy arrangement that runs the length of your table. "Delicate garlands of stephanotis mixed with hanging votives create a romantic atmosphere," says Kimm Birkicht of The Velvet Garden in Los Angeles.

  2. Roses Are the "It" Flower

    Rose ceremony aisle marker
    Photo by Dark Roux Photography

    Roses, synonymous with romance, are a universal symbol of love and beauty. "Brides used to dismiss them as too boring or played out, but now they're getting exposed to the incredible variety of roses that exist," says Corrente Schankler of Petal Design Studio in New York City. Expect this symbolic bud to make a comeback—in a big way. There are at least 120 varieties to choose from, and because many types are widely available, they're often reasonably priced as well. "I'm hearing many more specific requests for garden roses especially," notes Sarah Brysk Cohen of Blossom and Branch in Brooklyn, New York. From garden to spray and tea, there's a rose that will fit any look and color palette.

  3. Local + Seasonal Buds

    Local flowers tulip and artichoke centerpiece
    Photo by Tinywater Photography

    Local and sustainable isn't just a request for your caterer. "The whole farm-to-table movement has made its way to the flower world too, with brides looking for seasonal arrangements," says Denise Porcaro of Flower Girl NYC in New York City. In-season flowers are generally the freshest and, best of all, they usually cost less too. Speak to your florist about what's blooming in your region at the time of your wedding, then do your budget a favor and make these flowers the foundation of your centerpieces. If flowers top your wedding priority list and you're committed to a particular varietal, consider saying "I do" the same month your favorite bud is in bloom.

  4. Huppahs for Non-Jewish Weddings

    Flower-covered ceremony huppah
    Photo by BG Photography

    "Many couples are asking for structures similar to a traditional Jewish huppah for their altar décor," says Sierra Steifman of Poppies & Posies in New York City. Lush greenery and floral accents can transform a pergola or bring a simple canopied altar to life. "Branches are a popular choice right now," says Sara Formato of Flowers of the World in New York City. Indoor wedding? No problem. "Branchy arrangements can transform an indoor space into a lush garden," says Corrente Schankler of Petal Design Studio in New York City. "They're great for adding dimension to a large indoor space."

  5. Simple Bouquets

    All-white ranunculus and rose bridal bouquet
    Photo by Rustic White Photography

    Sometimes your gown or wedding style calls for a quiet, straightforward bouquet. "Brides don't want to be overpowered by their bunch and are looking for something that feels proportional," says Sara Formato of Flowers of the World in New York City. If you're worried your bouquet will overwhelm you, opt for a simple nosegay or posy. Glamelia bouquets (where hundreds of petals are combined to make a single bloom) are another beautiful option. "Because of the vintage craze, the glamelia has made a come back," says Kimm Birkicht of The Velvet Garden in Los Angeles. Looking for something effortless for your bridesmaids? Consider an herb bouquet or nonfloral elements, like colorful berries, feathers or barley stalks.

  6. Radiant Flowers (Not Just Orchids!)

    Radiant orchid tall reception centerpiece
    Photo by Raw Photo Design

    Every December, Pantone (the color authority for the design industry—and basically everyone else) announces the Color of the Year. For 2014, it’s radiant orchid. The color is feminine, but because it’s so poppy, it has an edge too. "Purple is a fun and vibrant color," says Denise Porcaro of Flower Girl NYC in New York City. "It can be modern, it can be ethereal and it's really season friendly." Best of all, there are lots of purple hues to choose from. "If you try and stretch purple, you're still into purple, just a deeper or lighter shade," Porcaro says. "It's not like stretching red and getting pink." If you want to keep the look feminine, go for light lavender. Deep purples look regal, and the combination of both light and dark hues takes on a really romantic Victorian vibe.

  7. Ferns

    Enchanted forest fern wedding decor
    Photo by Mademoiselle Fiona

    Ferns are springing up all over the wedding scene (think: enchanted forest). They're a great accent and charming enough for top billing in a bouquet or centerpiece. Lots of varietals exist, from lady ferns to curly-cue fiddleheads, so you're sure to find one that suits your style. "We love maidenhair, sword fern and mixing ferns with other green or white flowers," says Kimm Birkicht of The Velvet Garden in Los Angeles. Looking for something local? Head to your neighborhood forest. "We recently did a wedding in the Adirondack Mountains and spent the morning foraging for ferns in the woods to include in the centerpieces and bridal bouquets," says Corrente Schankler of Petal Design Studio in New York City.

  8. Terrariums + Air Plants

    Terrarium and feather wedding centerpiece
    Photo by Jen Fariello Photography

    Succulents are getting an upgrade. The arid climate plant is being used in terrariums to create beautiful centerpieces, aisle décor and table number displays. "We're getting a lot of requests for terrariums and hanging air plants," says Sierra Steifman of Poppies & Posies in New York City. Air plants grow without soil, which makes them perfect for displaying in various vessels. Try suspending them in glass globes from rafters or a ceiling to create a unique ambience. Take your venue into consideration when determining if this design style is best, recommends Sara Formato of Flowers of the World in New York City.

  9. White on White

    White bridal bouquet
    Photo by Joey Kennedy Photography

    White for weddings is as time-honored as the tradition of exchanging rings. It's elegant and always on trend. Want to spice it up without losing that clean, neutral look? Opt for a more organic, naturally shaped bouquet with textural filler, like white scabiosa, astilbe, dusty miller and maidenhair ferns. You'll keep the soft palette and the look of the bouquet will harken to a bygone era. "Different shades of white can look really beautiful and add a nice texture to a bouquet," says Denise Porcaro of Flower Girl NYC in New York City. "Try mixing white ranunculus with roses and you'll automatically get a textured feel."

  10. Flowers Everywhere

    Hydrangea reception table runner
    Photo by Caplan Miller Events

    Think of it as a flower explosion. Trellises, tables, walls—you name it, it's being covered in blooms. "The trend toward creating a garden aesthetic is still going strong," says Sierra Steifman of Poppies & Posies in New York City. "Draped floral garlands down long wooden tables, weaving through trees or down staircases will definitely be popular," says Kimm Birkicht of The Velvet Garden in Los Angeles. Flowers can be expensive, so choose elements that will shine throughout your wedding. "Make your wow factor, in terms of flowers, be a focal point," recommends Denise Porcaro of Flower Girl NYC in New York City. "It's a great place to spend because it will pack a lasting punch."

  11. Luxe Centerpieces + Candelabras

    Luxe stalk, carnation and rose tall reception centerpieces
    Photo by Kenny Kim Photography

    Big blooms are translating into focal points at the reception too. "We're getting lots of requests for larger, more lush centerpieces," says Sierra Steifman of Poppies & Posies in New York City. "There's a return to the classics, similar to what you see in old-world art," says Denise Porcaro of Flower Girl NYC in New York City. "The arrangements are just timeless." Dutch-master-inspired arrangements often include glamorous touches, like metallic vessels, candelabras and cut-crystal vases. "People are feeling increasingly more comfortable having a luxe look again," says Sarah Brysk Cohen of Blossom and Branch in Brooklyn, New York. "Brides are looking for an intentional, upscale look."

  12. Cascade Bouquet

    Cascade bridal bouquet
    Photo by Birds of a Feather Photography

    The classic cascade bouquet (think: Princess Diana) is making a comeback. "I think this trend appeals to brides who are drawn to vintage romance," says Corrente Schankler of Petal Design Studio in New York City. So what's changed since 1981? "My original cascading bouquets were tightly bound together but have now been freed up with lazy, loose bouquets and flowing ribbon," says Kimm Birkicht of The Velvet Garden in Los Angeles. This cascade is loose, not stiff and overly styled. Flowering vines, like clematis, passion vine and jasmine, are used to create the trailing design. "Brides who are asking for a cascade today want something hand tied and organic looking," Schankler says.

  13. The New Boutonniere

    Echeveria succulent groom's boutonniere
    Photo by Audrey Hannah Photography

    You're not the only with opinions on your wedding day blooms. "Grooms are increasingly looking for that unique ingredient—a craspedia, rose hip or succulent—something that has a little more personality," says Corrente Schankler of Petal Design Studio in New York City. Guide your groom to a flower that matches his personality and the theme of your wedding. If he's opposed to a lapel flower altogether, consider a pocket square instead. "A pocket square can be modern or traditional," says Sara Formato of Flowers of the World in New York City. "You can even get sentimental like my sister, who took a plaid pink-and-purple shirt my grandfather always wore and used it to make pocket squares for all her ushers as a way to honor him."

  14. Mismatched Bridesmaid Bouquets

    Mismatched bridesmaid bouquets in different colors
    Photo by Melissa Robotti Photography

    If you've put them all in the same dress, create a little individuality with their bouquets. Brides are mixing up bouquets, offering each attendant a different flower in the same hue. "A fun idea is to have each bridesmaid carry a single flower bouquet representative of the bride's bouquet," says Kimm Birkicht of The Velvet Garden in Los Angeles. This idea is best executed with proper ratios. "I think if it's two or three, it can be confusing, but with a larger group, say five bridesmaids, it works really well," says Denise Porcaro of Flower Girl NYC in New York City. "But keep the size and color the same, even when mixing the buds, to keep a cohesive look."

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